Pulling a blood feather

by Cuteyfroggirl9
(jacksonville FL.)

I read that the 2nd time that your parakeet's flight feather bleeds that you should pull it out so she doesn't bleed to death will it stop the bledding without hertong the bird?

Comments for Pulling a blood feather

Click here to add your own comments

Feb 02, 2011
STAY CALM
by: Anonymous

My baby conure lost his tail feathers due to some rough and tumble playing. Now that they're growing back, they occasionally bleed when he loses his balance or when he's startled and hops to the floor. At first we would panic and did actually pull out one such feather that kept causing trouble, which was nerve wracking to say the least. But now when it happens, I dip his butt in a bowl of flour so that the small amount of blood coming out of the shaft clots and quickly stops bleeding. I'm trying to give the feathers a chance to grow in so that the blood will recede and this won't be a problem anymore. I'm afraid of causing permanent damage to the follicles by plucking, which may cause the feathers to never grow back.

Dec 10, 2009
blood feathers
by: Anonymous

Actually there has only been cases of death by blood loss in birds who have had SEVERAL broken feathers. One broken feather has not caused death from blood loss nor will it do so.

It IS painful to pull a birds feather out & it DOES cause follicle damage to do so. It can be VERY quickly stopped simply by applying corn start to the birds broken feather. Pulling broken feathers is a very OLD technique that is gradually no longer being used & no longer recommend.

I recommend you do a little more research on this matter before you decide which is the best way to go in the future when it comes to broken or clipped blood feathers.

I am presuming by now you have sorted out this broken feather.

Dec 10, 2009
a site to go for instructions
by: Tracie

This website below says a bird can bleed to death, and I agree with that. She has pictures that might help though. Also, you can purchase a First Aid Kit for birds we have that has the perfect tool for pulling a feather if this happens to you. It is not the best time to try to get your bird to an avian vet when this happens.


http://www.tailfeathersnetwork.com/birdinformation/bloodfeathers.php

Dec 09, 2009
Pulling a blood feather
by: Linda

A BLEEDING BLOOD FEATHER IS AN EMERGENCY SITUATION, AND YOU MUST TAKE THEM TO AN AVIAN VET VERY QUICKLY OR THEY WILL BLEED OUT. ONCE A BLOOD FEATHER IS BROKEN AND BLEEDING, IT WILL NOT STOP UNTIL IT IS PULLED STRAIGHT OUT.

If you have not already taken your bird to vet or used needle-nosed pliers to pull this feather out, you bird is already passed.

To pull out a blood feather, use a clean pair of needle-nosed pliers, have someone else hold bird still, and pull the feather straight down and out the way it is growing out of the skin. Do not raise it up or turn it to the side, just pull it straight down and out. Put the pliers somewhere above or below the bleed.

I CANNOT STRESS HOW MUCH OF AN EMERGENCY THIS IS. Big Macaws will bleed out in less than an hour, and little birds are gone before we know what has happened sometimes.

Hopefully, you have taken care of your bird. In future, when something life threatening like this happens, call an Avian Vet and tell them you are bringing in an emergency, get bird and you in car and GO TO THE VET's office. You can also pull the feather out using the tool and procedure I described above. Blood will pool and coagulate soon after feather is pulled.

Anytime a bird is bleeding, it is an emergency. When it is a broken flood feather, time is very limited, and your bird's life hangs in the balance.

Linda

Dec 09, 2009
blood feathers
by: Anonymous

There are many people who choose to pull the bleeding feather out. Pulling out the bleeding feather does cause the vein to retract but it is not recommended. As well as it being painful to the bird, it can also cause follicle damage. It is a very unnecessary action to take.

If your bird has a bleeding feather, mix up some corn flour (corn starch) & aloe into a paste. This acts as a completely safe & painless 'glue' to stop the bleeding & the aloe is an antiseptic.

When a bird goes through a moult new pins break through the skin. This causes irritating skin. Bathing & high protein foods can help the pin & feather growth. If your bird allows it, some gentle massaging of the pins will help them the break, otherwise if left alone they will eventually break away with preening.

When new feathers are coming through they have a vein going through the shaft (Rachis). This vein helps to feed the feather for growth. This is called a blood feather & clipping blood feathers that?re not fully grown can cause bleeding. Once the feather has fully grown the vein retracts itself back from the shaft into the body. If you accidentally clip a blood feather you can put corn flour straight over the bleeding feather to clot & stop the bleeding. You can also make a paste out of corn flour & aloe gel to use as an antiseptic.

Styptic Powder is still widely used & often added to bird first aid kits but there have been cases of parrots dying after being applied. In other cases of using styptic powder the parrots have ended up with tissue burn, death & toxicity. Styptic powder inhaled by humans can irritate the respiratory system.Corn flour is cheaper, has no side effects & does the exactly the same thing.

There has been no actual evidence that a bird has bled to death from a blood feather either. Just dab the feather with corn flour & if it's sharp or looks like it might be irritating at the break, trim or file it so it isn't rough.

Click here to add your own comments