Should I separate my lovebirds?

by Tonya Cardwell
(Gloucester, Va)

Nero looking at the camera, and Nyx trying to stay away from me

Nero looking at the camera, and Nyx trying to stay away from me

I rescued two Peace-Faced lovebirds a few months ago from a family who wasn't taking care of them. I've tried bonding with them a lot, yet they still seem scared of me. I've read that you don't have to keep lovebirds in pairs, and that if you want to tame them it's better to keep only one.

When I rescued them, I really didn't want to take just one. I couldn't leave the other there to suffer more. It didn't seem right. So my question is: Should I separate them? And by that I mean give one away to someone I know will care for it properly. I don't seem to be making any progress with the both of them. Will it be easier if I only had one? I love them both and I want them to love me as well.

Thank you.

Comments for Should I separate my lovebirds?

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Nov 30, 2009
Should I separate my lovebirds?
by: Linda

Thank You for taking these two in and for taking good care of them. Due to the life they have suffered together, it would not be in either of their best interests to give one away. They have been mis-treated, neglected and possibly abused by the previous family. This will make them more afraid of you and your family, and maybe for a long time. If these were human children who had been put through similar experiences, the bonding takes a long time to happen. Bonding comes from TRUST, and these birds like the human children have lost the ability to trust.

I suggest you put them into two separate cages so that each has everything they need--nutritious pelleted diets, toys, natural branch perches and your love and commitment. Work with each bird separately by taking out of cage and teaching to step up. Use food at first to help build the trust. If they have a favorite food or fruit, when they are good with you, give them a bite or two of it. Keep training/bonding sessions short to no more than 10-15 minutes at a time. Then put bird up along with special treat and tell them "What a Good Job You Did" or "What a Good Bird You Are", you can fill in the blanks as you go. Reward any tiny little bit of progress. Build their self-confidence. Then work with the other one the same way. In time, you will start to see things change for the better. I'm not going to soft peddle this as it WILL take some time and commitment on your parts. Give these innocent little souls what they've never had, namely love and commitment to their health and well-being. Get reading material about the lovebirds, and there is a wealth of information on the internet. Tracie also has some training materials out here.

Take both birds to an Avian Vet BEFORE starting any training as these birds could be sick from neglect from the other home. Tell your vet their history, and they will know to look for bacterial infections and/or parasites inside and outside.

TAKE THEM TO AN AVIAN VET ONLY AS REGULAR DOG AND CAT VETS ARE NOT LICENSED TO CARE FOR BIRDS AND WILL DO MORE HARM THAN GOOD. If they need meds, give them to them as the vet prescribes. Once they have a clean bill of health, then begin your daily work with them.

God Bless you and your family for helping these helpless ones, and may that same God have mercy on the ones who neglected and abused these innocents. Keep us posted as we are always here for you!
Linda

Nov 30, 2009
love birds
by: Hillary

are called that for a reason. they need each other. Don't separate them unless they hurt each other. Google the bird and learn about it. You did a wonderful thing by taking them both. keep them.

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